Student Name

Olivia KlutseFollow

Prize

Second Place, Tied

Major

Sociology

Class Standing

Senior

Course Number and Title

SOCL 4790 Honors: Thesis Supervision

Research Project

Olivia’s project was sparked by scholars from philosophy and indigenous studies and the realization that “there is a deficit of literature which examines the conjoined economic and social liberation of Black and Indigenous people” that might lead to possibilities of collaboration and transformative justice. This literature review set the stage for her subsequent Sociology honors thesis project. Olivia reflected on her growth as a researcher describing her success with creating a structure for her research process, the satisfaction of serendipitous and intentional research (including reaching out to scholars in the field) and discovering new services in the library.

Dr. Rachel E. Luft, her faculty mentor observed, “Ms. Klutse is an excellent candidate for this recognition and I give her my highest recommendation. Ms. Klutse weaves together several literatures: Black liberation, Indigenous sovereignty, anarchist mutual aid, and critical land discourse. In doing so she is at the cutting edge of an emergent field: only in the last very few years have scholars begun to juxtapose these kinds of concerns. In this way Ms. Klutse is not so much studying a field as helping to create it.”

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    Repatriation and Reparations: Land-Based Indigenous and Black Futurity

    Olivia’s project was sparked by scholars from philosophy and indigenous studies and the realization that “there is a deficit of literature which examines the conjoined economic and social liberation of Black and Indigenous people” that might lead to possibilities of collaboration and transformative justice. This literature review set the stage for her subsequent Sociology honors thesis project. Olivia reflected on her growth as a researcher describing her success with creating a structure for her research process, the satisfaction of serendipitous and intentional research (including reaching out to scholars in the field) and discovering new services in the library.

    Dr. Rachel E. Luft, her faculty mentor observed, “Ms. Klutse is an excellent candidate for this recognition and I give her my highest recommendation. Ms. Klutse weaves together several literatures: Black liberation, Indigenous sovereignty, anarchist mutual aid, and critical land discourse. In doing so she is at the cutting edge of an emergent field: only in the last very few years have scholars begun to juxtapose these kinds of concerns. In this way Ms. Klutse is not so much studying a field as helping to create it.”